– VANISHING

Arogos skipper, 2017

Mixed media on paper

Sturgeon, 2017

Mixed media monoprint

Installation view, Hanging on a thread, 2014

Cut paper, watercolor, thread & T pins, 10 x 5 feet, Farmers Market Riverhead, NY, 2014

Hanging on a thread - Northern long-eared bat (Myotis septentrionalis)

Hanging on a thread - Pufferfish

Hanging on a thread, detail – Bat, 2014Detail 'Hanging on a thread'

– Alewife, 2014

Graphite on paper, 15 x 22 inches

– Clam, 2014

Graphite on paper, 15 x 22 inches

Alewife blocked, 2014

Acrylic, maker, crayon & pencil on paper, 11 x 14 inches

Hanging on a thread – Bat, 2014. Acrylic, maker & pencil on paper. 11 x 14 inches

Study for Hanging on a tread, 2014

Installation view, Going, going, going, gone - Honey bee, 2014

42 in x 8 yards (106.7 cm x 7.32m)

Alewife blocked, 2014, Acrylic, liquid watercolor on paper, 24 x 30 inches

– Clean water, 2014

Installation view, Going, going, going, gone - Scallop, 2014

Pencil on paper roll, 42 in x 8 yards (106.7 cm x 7.32m)

Installation view, Going, going, going, gone - Quail, 2014

Pencil on paper roll, 42 in x 8 yards (106.7 cm x 7.32m)

Fragile bee, 2014

Hanging on a thread, 2014

Pining for you, 2014, Pitch pines in burlap covered pots

Eelgrass, 2014

Pencil and found plastic bits on paper. 6 x 6 inches

Installation view, "Vanishing"

Erased pencil & found plastic bits on paper. Nine parts each 22 x 30 inches

- Oysters

Mixed media

Vanishing - Bat, 2014

Erased pencil & found plastic bits on paper. 22 x 30 inches

Vanishing - Eelgrass, 2014

Erased pencil & found plastic bits on paper. 22 x 30 inches

Vanishing - Alewife, 2014

Erased pencil & found plastic bits on paper. 22 x 30 inches

Hanging on a thread, 2014 Detail

Arogos skipper, 2017
Sturgeon, 2017
Installation view, Hanging on a thread, 2014
Hanging on a thread - Northern long-eared bat (Myotis septentrionalis)
Hanging on a thread - Pufferfish
Hanging on a thread, detail – Bat, 2014Detail 'Hanging on a thread'
– Alewife, 2014
– Clam, 2014
Alewife blocked, 2014
Hanging on a thread – Bat, 2014. Acrylic, maker & pencil on paper. 11 x 14 inches
Study for Hanging on a tread, 2014
Installation view, Going, going, going, gone - Honey bee, 2014
Alewife blocked, 2014, Acrylic, liquid watercolor on paper, 24 x 30 inches
– Clean water, 2014
Installation view, Going, going, going, gone - Scallop, 2014
Installation view, Going, going, going, gone - Quail, 2014
Fragile bee, 2014
Hanging on a thread, 2014
Pining for you, 2014, Pitch pines in burlap covered pots
Eelgrass, 2014
Installation view,
- Oysters
Vanishing - Bat, 2014
Vanishing - Eelgrass, 2014
Vanishing - Alewife, 2014
Hanging on a thread, 2014 Detail

– VANISHING is an ongoing series of animals and plants becoming LOST to New York; -Eelgrass beds,   -Honey Bees, -Clams, -Alewife, -Monarch Butterflies, -Bats, -Piping Plover, -Woodcock, -Quail, – Horseshoe crabs, -Yellow Spotted Salamander, -Puffer Fish, -Oysters and -Pitch Pines.

30 years of brown tides on the South Shore. 90 percent of seagrass beds are now gone, and as much as 80 percent of salt marshes are also gone. 99 percent reduction in hard clams harvested in the Great South Bay.
– VANISHING consists of 6 parts:
1. ‘Hanging on a thread’ is an large wall installation of hand painted watercolors on cut paper, hung on white thread & steel pins. The delicate watercolors are a reflection of urban sprawl, pollution, and overfishing.

2. ‘Going, going, going, gone’ is a series of large-scale graphite drawings, of the vanishing plants & animals repeated as graphic icons that fade down from ceiling to floor on long rolls of paper. 42 x 150 inches.

3. ‘Vanishing’ is a series of large-scale pencil drawings combined with found bits of beach plastic pollution, as well as hand stencilled lettering that disappears down the page.

4. ‘Erased’ is a series of drawings that have been erased in areas and plastic pollution is appearing.

5. ‘Hanging by a thread’, 5 min looping video. Filmed on Cuttyhunk Island. https://vimeo.com/141440847

6. ‘Lost forever’ a 35mm slide projection of historical photographs that illustrate the history of Suffolk County and Long Island. Duck farms, potato farms, dirt roads and historic buildings bring history alive as the viewer clicks through the carousel. Showing Long Island in the early twentieth century.

Presented by East Ends Arts and the Town of Riverhead

Special thanks to:

Matthew Sclafani, PhD Cornell University Cooperative Extension

Kimberly Barbour, Habitat Restoration Outreach Specialist, Cornell Cooperative Extension Marine Program

Pat Snyder, Executive Director, East End Arts

Kathryn Curran, Executive Director, Suffolk County Historical Museum

Katie Rose Leonard, Program Manager, Pine Barrens Society

Sheldon Gordon, Riverhead Enterprises

Shirley Wegner, Artist

Dana Adamson, Embroidery

Hannah Gray, Icehouse Gallery

Neil Watson, Executive Director, The Long Island Museum

Jody DeMeyere, Manager, Long Island National Wildlife Refuge Complex

John Rago, Technology consultant

Jose Coropuna, Volunteer

Dennis Maroulas, Photography

 

Endangered species, threatened species and species of special concern of New York state
http://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/7494.html

Endangered

Those endangered species which meet one or both of the criteria specified in section 182.2(g) of 6NYCRR Part 182 and which are found, have been found, or may be expected to be found in New York State include:

Molluscs like clams, oysters, mussels, and conch are soft-bodied animals that build their own hard-outer shell for protection. To create the shell, they use an organ called a “mantle” to secrete a hard substance known as “nacre” over their body. Many of these organisms are crucial to New York ecosystems because they recycle plant and animal waste, and keep water clean and healthy. If those species were to become extinct, the ecosystem would eventually become contaminated and many other organisms could die out.

Common Name Scientific Name
Molluscs Dwarf Wedgemussel Alasmidonta heterodon
1Pink mucket Lampsilis abrupta
Clubshell Pleurobema clava
1Fat pocketbook Potamilus capax
Rayed Bean Villosa fabalis
2Chittenango Ovate Amber Snail Novisuccinea chittenangoensis
Insects Tomah Mayfly Siphlonisca aerodromia
1,3American Burying Beetle Nicrophorus americanus
Hessel’s Hairstreak Callophrys hesseli
1Karner Blue Butterfly Lycaeides melissa samuelis
Regal Fritillary Speyeria idalia
Persius Duskywing Erynnis persius
Grizzled Skipper Pyrgus centaureae wyandot
Arogos Skipper Atrytone arogos arogos
Bog Buckmoth Hemileuca species 1
Pine Pinion Moth Lithophane lepida lepida
Fishes 1Shortnose Sturgeon Acipenser brevirostrum
3Silver Chub Macrhybopsis storeriana
Pugnose Shiner Notropis anogenus
Round Whitefish Prosopium cylindraceum
Bluebreast Darter Etheostoma camurum
3Gilt Darter Percina evides
3Spoonhead Sculpin Cottus ricei
Deepwater Sculpin Myoxocephalus thompsoni
Amphibians Tiger Salamander Ambystoma tigrinum
Northern Cricket Frog Acris crepitans
Reptiles Mud Turtle Kinosternon subrubrum
2Bog Turtle Clemmys muhlenbergii
1Atlantic Hawksbill Sea Turtle Eretmochelys imbricata
1Atlantic Ridley Sea Turtle Lepidochelys kempii
1Leatherback Sea Turtle Dermochelys coriacea
Queen Snake Regina septemvittata
Massasauga Sistrurus catenatus
Birds Spruce Grouse Falcipennis canadensis
3Golden Eagle Aquila chrysaetos
Peregrine Falcon Falco peregrinus
Black Rail Laterallus jamaicensis
1,2,4Piping Plover Charadrius melodus
1,3Eskimo Curlew Numenius borealis
1Roseate Tern Sterna dougallii dougallii
Black Tern Chlidonias niger
Short-eared Owl Asio flammeus
Loggerhead Shrike Lanius ludovicianus
Mammals 1Indiana Bat Myotis sodalis
3Allegheny Woodrat Neotoma magister
1Sperm Whale Physeter catodon
1Sei Whale Balaenoptera borealis
1Blue Whale Balaenoptera musculus
1Finback Whale Balaenoptera physalus
1Humpback Whale Megaptera novaeangliae
1Right Whale Eubalaena glacialis
1,3Gray Wolf Canis lupus
1,3Cougar Felis concolor

Threatened

Those threatened species which meet one or both of the criteria specified in section 182.2(h) of 6NYCRR Part 182 and which are found, have been found, or may be expected to be found in New York State include:

Common Name Scientific Name
Molluscs Brook Floater Alasmidonta varicosa
Wavy-rayed Lampmussel Lampsilis fasciola
Green Floater Lasmigona subviridis
Insects Pine Barrens Bluet Enallagma recurvatum
Scarlet Bluet Enallagma pictum
Little Bluet Enallagma minisculum
2,3Northeastern Beach Tiger Beetle Cicindela dorsalis dorsalis
Frosted Elfin Callophrys irus
Fishes Lake Sturgeon Acipenser fulvescens
Mooneye Hiodon tergisus
3Lake Chubsucker Erimyzon sucetta
Gravel Chub Erimystax x-punctata
3Mud Sunfish Acantharchus pomotis
Banded Sunfish Enneacanthus obesus
Longear Sunfish Lepomis megalotis
Longhead Darter Percina macrocephala
Eastern Sand Darter Ammocrypta pellucida
Swamp Darter Etheostoma fusiforme
Spotted Darter Etheostoma maculatum
Amphibians None Listed
Reptiles Blanding’s Turtle Emydoidea blandingii
2Green Sea Turtle Chelonia mydas
2Loggerhead Sea Turtle Caretta caretta
Fence Lizard Sceloporus undulatus
Timber Rattlesnake Crotalus horridus
Birds Pied-billed Grebe Podilymbus podiceps
Least Bittern Ixobrychus exilis
Bald Eagle Haliaeetus leucocephalus
Northern Harrier Circus cyaneus
King Rail Rallus elegans
Upland Sandpiper Bartramia longicauda
Common Tern Sterna hirundo
Least Tern Sterna antillarum
Sedge Wren Cistothorus platensis
Henslow’s Sparrow Ammodramus henslowii
Mammals 2,3Canada Lynx Lynx canadensis
2Northern Long-eared Bat Myotis septentrionalis

Special Concern

The following are designated as species of special concern as defined in Section 182.2(i) of 6NYCRR Part 182. Species of special concern warrant attention and consideration but current information, collected by the department, does not justify listing these species as either endangered or threatened.

Common Name Scientific Name
Molluscs Buffalo Pebble Snail Gillia altilis
Fringed Valvata Valvata lewisi
Mossy Valvata Valvata sincera
Insects Unnamed Dragonfly Species Gomphus spec. nov.
Southern Sprite Nehalennia integricollis
Extra Striped Snaketail Ophiogomphus anomalus
Pygmy Snaketail Ophiogomphus howei
Common Sanddragon Progomphus obscurus
Gray Petaltail Tachopteryx thoreyi
Checkered White Pontia protodice
Olympia Marble Euchloe olympia
Henry’s Elfin Callophrys henrici
Tawny Crescent Phyciodes batesii
Mottled Duskywing Erynnis martialis
Barrens Buckmoth Hemileuca maia
Herodias Underwing Catocala herodias gerhardi
Jair Underwing Catocala jair
A Noctuid Moth Heterocampa varia
Fishes Mountain Brook Lamprey Ichthyomyzon greeleyi
Black Redhorse Moxostoma duquesnei
Streamline Chub Erymystax dissimilis
Redfin Shiner Lythrurus umbratilis
Ironcolor Shiner Notropis chalybaeus
Amphibians Hellbender Cryptobranchus alleganiensis
Marbled Salamander Ambystoma opacum
Jefferson Salamander Ambystoma jeffersonianum
Blue-spotted Salamander Ambystoma laterale
Longtail Salamander Eurycea longicauda
Eastern Spadefoot Toad Scaphiopus holbrookii
Southern Leopard Frog Rana sphenocephala utricularius
Reptiles Spotted Turtle Clemmys guttata
Wood Turtle Clemmys insculpta
Eastern Box Turtle Terrapene carolina
Eastern Spiny Softshell Apalone spinifera
Eastern Hognose Snake Heterodon platyrhinos
Worm Snake Carphophis amoenus
Birds Common Loon Gavia immer
American Bittern Botaurus lentiginosus
Osprey Pandion haliaetus
Sharp-shinned Hawk Accipiter striatus
Cooper’s Hawk Accipiter cooperii
Northern Goshawk Accipiter gentilis
Red-shouldered Hawk Buteo lineatus
Black Skimmer Rynchops niger
Common Nighthawk Chordeiles minor
Whip-poor-will Caprimulgus vociferus
Red-headed Woodpecker Melanerpes erythrocephalus
Horned Lark Eremophila alpestris
Bicknell’s Thrush Catharus bicknelli
Golden-winged Warbler Vermivora chrysoptera
Cerulean Warbler Dendroica cerulea
Yellow-breasted Chat Icteria virens
Vesper Sparrow Pooecetes gramineus
Grasshopper Sparrow Ammodramus savannarum
Seaside Sparrow Ammodramus maritimus
Mammals Small-footed Bat Myotis leibii
New England Cottontail Sylvilagus transitionalis
Harbor Porpoise Phocoena phocoena

1Currently listed as “endangered” by the U. S. Department of the Interior.

2Currently listed as “threatened” by the U. S. Department of the Interior.

3Species is extirpated from New York State.

4Piping Plover is listed as federally endangered in the Great Lakes Region, and as federally threatened in the Atlantic Coastal Region.

Definitions

Extinct – Species is no longer living or existing.

Extirpated – Species is not extinct, but no longer occurring in a wild state within New York, or no longer exhibiting patterns of use traditional for that species in New York (e.g. historical breeders no longer breeding here).

Endangered – Any native species in imminent danger of extirpation or extinction in New York State.

Threatened – Any native species likely to become an endangered species within the foreseeable future in New York State.

Special Concern – Any native species for which a welfare concern or risk of endangerment has been documented in New York State.

Endangered Species

endangered species, any plant or animal species whose ability to survive and reproduce has been jeopardized by human activities. In 1999 the U.S. government, in accordance with the U.S. Endangered Species Act (1973), classified 935 native species as endangered or threatened, including animals such as the Florida panther, the Key deer, the San Joaquin kit fox, the northern spotted owl, the chinook salmon, the Karner blue butterfly, the snail darter, and the cave crayfish and plants such as the Hawaiian nehe and the clover lupine. Over 500 more species were so classified worldwide. The official list of endangered wildlife and plants in the United States is kept by the Fish and Wildlife Service; the National Marine Fisheries Service oversees marine species. In addition, many states keep their own lists. The International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources maintains an international list, published as the Red Data Book.

Causes of Endangerment

Hunting, trapping, and poisoning to protect livestock have taken a great toll among predatory mammals and birds. Overharvesting is currently threatening species worldwide, especially food fish species such as the cod. A large number of species are threatened by introduced species, or “exotics,” plants or animals that are introduced into a habitat and bring with them diseases or the ability to compete more effectively than native species. The now ubiquitous European starling, for example, purposely introduced into the United States in the 1890s, is displacing the native American bluebird and other species, and the brown tree snake, native to Australia and introduced to Guam during World War II, has preyed on native species of that island to the extent that nine bird species are now extinct. Another danger is hybridization with other species and subspecies.

Another important threat is destruction of habitat by chemical pollutants. For example, bird populations have suffered great losses because of insecticides. The chemicals they contain, such as DDT, accumulate in birds’ bodies and interfere with calcium metabolism. As a result, the females lay eggs with extremely thin shells or no shells at all, so the embryos do not survive to hatching. Acid rain has destroyed the habitats of many North American fish and amphibians by lowering the pH of surface waters. It is also changing the soil chemistry and harming many tree species.

Most serious of all, the destruction of physical habitat—by the drainage and filling of swamps and marshes, by the damming of rivers, by the leveling of forests for residential and industrial development, by strip mining, and by oil spills and water pollution—has left many creatures with literally no room in which to live and breed. For example, only 5% of the original forests in the 48 coterminous states, i.e., those forests that were present at the time of the first European settlement, are still standing.